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Becoming a Category of One Book Review

Book Name: Becoming a Category of One
How Extraordinary Companies Transcend Commodity and Defy Comparison
By: Joe Calloway
Publsiher: John Wiley & Sons, 2003, 2009
243 pages

While Calloway's book is a revised and updated edition of his 2003 release, the information he provides is not any different than any other marketing or set your company apart from the others book.

The social marketing phenom om that has hit over the last two years is missing entirely. The most unique part of the book is that Calloway suggests that a company should develop their own category and by default that company would be number one in that category versus competing with other companies in the current categories.

The problem is that Calloway gives examples and case studies of what he feels are category of one companies, but he does not really give steps on how to create the category. He only details what a category of one company would do to become number one in a category of one.

The book is an easy read and includes a good chapter on branding. He reiterates that a company's brand is not created through advertising, public relations, or even product design. Brands are created by the customer's perception of a company. The customer creates the brand.

It is a good book for someone just starting a new company. The book does provide foundational theories for how to compete, what good customer service is, and how to be an exceptional company.

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A few new terms introduced include "pink profits", "asset-to-estrogen", "a new all" and the title itself, "womenomics."

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A list of recent book reviews

This has been a very busy summer for writing assignments. Unfortunately I’ve made very few blog entries over the past several months. I vow to get better and start posting more regularly. For now, here are a few links that will take you to a few recent book reviews on Blogcritics.

Your Life Isn’t for You: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-your-life-isnt-for-you-a-selfish-persons-guide-to-being-selfless-by-seth-adam-smith/
Dogs Rule Nonchalantly: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-dogs-rule-nonchalantly-by-mark-ulriksen/
Javascript and Jquery:http://blogcritics.org/book-review-javascript-jquery-by-jon-duckett/
Please Stop Helping Us: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-please-stop-helping-us-jason-l-riley/
Challenge the Ordinary: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-challenge-the-ordinary-by-linda-d-henman-ph-d/
Keys to the Corner Office: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-keys-to-the-corner-office-by-rhonda-rhyne/
How to Write Anything: http://blogcritics.org/book-review-how-to-write-anything…